Caprice

“War
The tit-for-tat inability of either side to back away from conflict, for fear of being perceived as weak or as cooperating with the enemy, has been the cause of many prolonged conflicts throughout history. However, the tit for tat strategy has also been detected by analysts in the spontaneous non-violent behaviour, called “live and let live” that arose during trench warfare in the First World War. Troops dug in only a few hundred feet from each other would evolve an unspoken understanding. If a sniper killed a soldier on one side, the other expected an equal retaliation. Conversely, if no one was killed for a time, the other side would acknowledge this implied “truce” and act accordingly. This created a “separate peace” between the trenches.”

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Tit-for-tat

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“Valerian (/vəˈlɪəriən/; Latin: Publius Licinius Valerianus; c. 199 – 260 or 264) was Roman emperor from 253 to spring 260 AD. He persecuted Christians and was later taken captive by the Persian emperor Shapur I after the Battle of Edessa, becoming the first Roman emperor to be captured as a prisoner of war, causing shock and instability throughout the Roman Empire.”

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Valerian_(emperor)

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“The censor (at any time, there were two) was a magistrate in ancient Rome who was responsible for maintaining the census, supervising public morality, and overseeing certain aspects of the government’s finances.[1] The power of the censor was absolute: no magistrate could oppose his decisions, and only another censor who succeeded him could cancel those decisions. The censor’s regulation of public morality is the origin of the modern meaning of the words censor and censorship.”

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Roman_censor

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“The term magistrate is used in a variety of systems of governments and laws to refer to a civilian officer who administers the law. In ancient Rome, a magistratus was one of the highest ranking government officers, and possessed both judicial and executive powers.”

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Magistrate

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"In ancient Rome, the word magistratus referred to one of the highest offices of state."

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“The censor (at any time, there were two) was a magistrate in ancient Rome who was responsible for maintaining the census, supervising public morality, and overseeing certain aspects of the government’s finances.[1] The power of the censor was absolute: no magistrate could oppose his decisions, and only another censor who succeeded him could cancel those decisions.

The censor's regulation of public morality is the origin of the modern meaning of the words censor and censorship."

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Roman_censor

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“Valerian was chosen censor by the Senate,[5] though he declined to accept the post. During the reign of Decius he was left in charge of affairs in Rome when that prince left for his ill-fated last campaign in Illyricum.”

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“The censor (at any time, there were two) was a magistrate in ancient Rome who was responsible for maintaining the census, supervising public morality, and overseeing certain aspects of the government’s finances.[1] The power of the censor was absolute: no magistrate could oppose his decisions, and only another censor who succeeded him could cancel those decisions. The censor’s regulation of public morality is the origin of the modern meaning of the words censor and censorship.”

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Roman_censor

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“Valerian was chosen censor by the Senate,[5] though he declined to accept the post. During the reign of Decius he was left in charge of affairs in Rome when that prince left for his ill-fated last campaign in Illyricum.”

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“Valerian (/vəˈlɪəriən/; Latin: Publius Licinius Valerianus; c. 199 – 260 or 264) was Roman emperor from 253 to spring 260 AD. He persecuted Christians and was later taken captive by the Persian emperor Shapur I after the Battle of Edessa, becoming the first Roman emperor to be captured as a prisoner of war, causing shock and instability throughout the Roman Empire.”

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Valerian_(emperor)

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"caprice (n.)

"sudden change or start of the mind without apparent motive," 1660s, from French caprice "whim" (16c.), from Italian capriccio "whim," originally "a shivering," a word of uncertain origin.

Some guesses from 19c. are that it is from capro "goat," with reference to frisking, from Latin capreolus "wild goat," or that the Italian word is connected with capo "head" + riccio "curl, frizzled," literally "hedgehog" (from Latin ericius).

The notion in this case would be of the hair standing on end, hence a person shivering in fear."

https://www.etymonline.com/word/caprice

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You should not have bent the knee anakin 😄

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I am bored with the concept of envy. I am interested in caprice now.

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The real problem is not whether machines think but whether men do.

B. F. Skinner

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